Alison Watros, Windhaven House Founder & Director

alison watros - windhaven house founder and director - transitional living for women in recovery - dallas sober living

Alison Watros is the founder and Director of Windhaven House.  Her passion and most valuable transformational attribute is to help women find their way in sobriety.  This passion is a product of her own recovery journey – one that has been shaped through treatment, 12-step work, service work, sober living, and ultimately, a career change from real estate to the field of substance abuse.

Alison states, “I knew I wanted to help other people as soon as I immersed myself in my own recovery program.”  She started working as a volunteer at the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence of Central Mississippi (NCADD) while still in drug and alcohol treatment.  NCADD then hired her full time to work with troubled youth, teaching Life Skills curriculum.

Two years into sobriety she moved back to Dallas to be near family.  Attempting to find and create a support system, she immersed herself in the local recovery community.  In helping others struggling with sobriety, she began to dream of providing a place for women to experience recovery and reclaim their lives.

In the 10 years prior to opening Windhaven House, she worked at the Council on Alcohol & Drug Abuse in Dallas.  Starting as a Life Skills facilitator, she eventually became the Director of Prevention Programs, overseeing all prevention activities in 19 North Texas counties, accountable for state and federal grants, and managing all associated staff. She has trained thousands of people on various topics dealing with substance abuse both locally and nationally.

Windhaven House is an extraordinarily special house that has always been filled with unconditional love. It was originally Alison’s father’s home, before he passed away  from Leukemia in April of 2011. “My dad was my biggest fan and often voiced his gratitude to the interventions that were done on my behalf and the programs that taught me how to live life sober,” Alison says. “Had it not been for those programs, I would not have been the daughter I needed to be for him when he got sick.” She firmly believes it was a natural progression and part of his legacy for his house to evolve into a sober living home for women.

Windhaven’s first house opened in early 2012.  The focus encompasses all areas of life – emotional, spiritual, and physical.  The concentration is on essential life skills needed to become productive members of society.  The women of Windhaven House will experience structure, accountability, responsibility and most of all, love.

“We aren’t a glum lot. If newcomers could see no joy or fun in our existence, they wouldn’t want it. We absolutely insist on enjoying life.”

–Alcoholics Anonymous p. 132